Language Cards On White Walls

I enjoy learning languages in general so this is where all of my language bits and pieces will go so that they don't overflow too much onto my main blog. I also enjoy writing, so there will be writing posts and book posts as well. Enjoy. If you have any questions, feel free to ask! (btw, I'm Summer!)

jespru:

I think one of the most significant moments you can have as a language learner is when you know the meaning of a word, but you can’t explain it in your native language. Because, as frustrating as it may be, it does confirm that that particular language is carving out its own autonomous little nook of your brain.

(via laslanguesromanze)

girlwithalessonplan:

gjmueller:

Are Great Teachers Born or Made?

One of the best teachers in Elizabeth Green’s new book, Building a Better Teacher, uses an analogy to convey the intricacy and difficulty of her craft. “Every single time I get on a plane,” she says, “I’m really glad that the plane is not being flown by someone who just always loved planes … But that’s what we do in this country. We take people who are committed to children, and we say … work on it, figure it out.”
This is just one of many comparisons that teachers make in Green’s book. They also liken their profession to surgery, general medicine, nursing, professional athletics, and even chamber music. The metaphors converge on the same point: Not only is teaching technically demanding, its complex component skills can be studied, isolated, practiced, and ultimately improved. Teaching, in short, can be taught.




Currently reading!  With school starting, it’s taking me a while to finish, but it promised Norton I’d have a full commentary when done.  :)

girlwithalessonplan:

gjmueller:

Are Great Teachers Born or Made?

One of the best teachers in Elizabeth Green’s new book, Building a Better Teacher, uses an analogy to convey the intricacy and difficulty of her craft. “Every single time I get on a plane,” she says, “I’m really glad that the plane is not being flown by someone who just always loved planes … But that’s what we do in this country. We take people who are committed to children, and we say … work on it, figure it out.”

This is just one of many comparisons that teachers make in Green’s book. They also liken their profession to surgery, general medicine, nursing, professional athletics, and even chamber music. The metaphors converge on the same point: Not only is teaching technically demanding, its complex component skills can be studied, isolated, practiced, and ultimately improved. Teaching, in short, can be taught.

Currently reading! With school starting, it’s taking me a while to finish, but it promised Norton I’d have a full commentary when done. :)

koujakuandthediamonds:

the worst is when you’re reading a really good book that follows multiple characters’ stories and you love it 90% of the time until it periodically switches back to that one character’s story that you just could not care less about and it’s like an entire chapter of internal groaning while waiting for the plot to switch back to a character you actually care about

(via books-booksandmorebooks)